How and Why Businesses Are Adopting Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality

At the 2018 Consumer Electronics show, robots, voice assistants, connected cars, and even connected cities created buzz. Augmented reality and virtual reality – not so much, with the exception of augmented reality applications in the automotive industry.

But proponents of augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) should take heart: the real action with AR and VR isn’t happening with consumer products, anyway. The compelling stories about AR and VR are happening on the enterprise side.

Throughout 2017, companies such as Audi, Ford, IKEA, Sephora, and Walmart shared examples of how they’re using AR and VR to run their businesses more effectively. For example:

  • Augmented reality simplifies the purchase decision for IKEA customers: IKEA released Place, an app that makes it possible for shoppers to see how IKEA furniture might look in their living spaces.

With augmented reality, users overlay simpler forms of content on to their physical spaces, usually by using their mobile phones. Niantic’s Pokémon GO and forthcoming Harry Potter games are examples. With Place, users overlay 3D models of furniture into their physical spaces to test for fit, which takes reduces the risk of buying a sofa or bookshelf before carting it home. Continue reading

Auto shopping in 3-D

Razorfish operations in Germany, known as Neue Digitale/Razorfish, have launched the first real-time 3-D configurator for Microsoft Surface — which makes it possible for multiple customers to design their own Audi A4 automobile together.  Consumers can collaborate to design their own car, including adjusting the paint finish and selecting packaging components.  The final configuration is projected on to a high-definition display.

This an experience best seen, not explained — so have fun with the video above.

Razorfish (my employer) and our global network have been employing touch-based environments in industries such as retail and automotive for quite some time.  We strive to show how the art of branding is about building great consumer experiences, not plastering one-way messages.  Check out the Razorfish Emerging Experiences blog for more examples including the Razorfashion application.