Sheraton enables user-generated March Madness

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Just in time for the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament, Sheraton Hotels & Resorts has worked with my employer Avenue A | Razorfish to launch an innovative user-generated marketing campaign, SheratonWave.com. On the SheratonWave site, sports fans can post videos of themselves performing the iconic hand “wave” (hitherto an experience reserved for inebriated stadium dwellers). Fans who submit their own waves become eligibile to win tickets to the 2009 NCAA Men’s Final Four.

Meantime, SheratonWave threads together individual waves to create an endless surge of hands. Moreover, participants can tag their own waves with affiliations including their favorite schools and follow a scoreboard that displays the most active college wave entrants.

Sheraton is the Official Hotel Sponsor of the NCAA and an active social media enthusiast. Last year, Sheraton worked with Avenue A | Razorfish to allow travelers to upload their Sheraton experiences on Sheraton.com. It’s good to see the big brands taking the lead in social media.

As of March 12, Penn State leads the scoreboard on the SheratonWave. They play basketball there?

Sheraton enables user-generated March Madness

wave.jpg

Just in time for the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament, Sheraton Hotels & Resorts has worked with my employer Avenue A | Razorfish to launch an innovative user-generated marketing campaign, SheratonWave.com. On the SheratonWave site, sports fans can post videos of themselves performing the iconic hand “wave” (hitherto an experience reserved for inebriated stadium dwellers). Fans who submit their own waves become eligibile to win tickets to the 2009 NCAA Men’s Final Four.

Meantime, SheratonWave threads together individual waves to create an endless surge of hands. Moreover, participants can tag their own waves with affiliations including their favorite schools and follow a scoreboard that displays the most active college wave entrants.

Sheraton is the Official Hotel Sponsor of the NCAA and an active social media enthusiast. Last year, Sheraton worked with Avenue A | Razorfish to allow travelers to upload their Sheraton experiences on Sheraton.com. It’s good to see the big brands taking the lead in social media.

As of March 12, Penn State leads the scoreboard on the SheratonWave. They play basketball there?

What do you think of the Comcast Facebook group?

comcast.jpg

Comcast recently invited me to become a member of the Facebook “Join the Conversation with Comcast” group. A company having a Facebook page or group is all the rage these days. I recommend organizations embrace Facebook to learn more about your stakeholders, share information, and to listen. (My employer Avenue A | Razorfish uses its Facebook page to post opportunities for job seekers.) Having said that, I’m not so sure I buy the Comcast group. A lot of the entries read like ham-handed marketing copy from company evangelists who seem to really love Comcast. On the other hand, I’ve noticed that consumers (like me) are using the group to post complaints about Comcast service (on the group wall), and someone from Comcast appears to be reading the complaints and offering to help. Incidentally, I did join the Comcast group, and here’s my contribution to the Comcast group wall: “when I signed up for Comcast in 1997, Comcast charged me $25 a month. Fast forward to 2008: Comcast charges me $57 a month for the exact same service in the same location.”

It will be interesting to see how consumers continue to react to this group, and what Comcast does about it.

What do you think of the Comcast Facebook group?

comcast.jpg

Comcast recently invited me to become a member of the Facebook “Join the Conversation with Comcast” group. A company having a Facebook page or group is all the rage these days. I recommend organizations embrace Facebook to learn more about your stakeholders, share information, and to listen. (My employer Avenue A | Razorfish uses its Facebook page to post opportunities for job seekers.) Having said that, I’m not so sure I buy the Comcast group. A lot of the entries read like ham-handed marketing copy from company evangelists who seem to really love Comcast. On the other hand, I’ve noticed that consumers (like me) are using the group to post complaints about Comcast service (on the group wall), and someone from Comcast appears to be reading the complaints and offering to help. Incidentally, I did join the Comcast group, and here’s my contribution to the Comcast group wall: “when I signed up for Comcast in 1997, Comcast charged me $25 a month. Fast forward to 2008: Comcast charges me $57 a month for the exact same service in the same location.”

It will be interesting to see how consumers continue to react to this group, and what Comcast does about it.